Dial A Bottle Victoria BC - Liquor Delivery Service Victoria BC
Call Victoria Liquor Delivery Service To Dial A Bottle Today 250-882-7861
Dial A Bottle Victoria BC - Liquor Delivery Service Victoria BC
Dial a Bottle from Victoria liquor delivery service, We offer bottle delivery in Victoria. Dial a bottle for delivery in Victoria pay with debit/credit/cash.
Liquor Delivery Service Victoria BC, Food Service Delivery Victoria BC,
Debit/Credit Accepted, Any Restaurant or Fast Food Outlet in Victoria BC,
We are the lowest priced Liquor Delivery Service in Victoria BC!
We are the Lowest Priced EVERYTHING Delivery Service in Victoria BC
.
Our Mission Statement: To Provide An Affordable Alternative To Drinking And Driving.

$600 First Offense For .05-.08 BAC, $4060 Cost For Over .08 BAC + Possible Criminal Charges.

Call us now 250-882-7861
Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT DELIVERY PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE
 
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No Restrictions! Liquor Store Prices!
Beer Delivery Service Victoria BC
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Grocery Delivery Service Victoria BC
Why Pay More!
Liquor Delivery,
  Partner Restaurants Delivery,
 
Non-Partner Restaurant Delivery,
  Grocery Delivery,
Express Delivery

We will also pick up/delivery orders from any restaurant in Victoria BC, pizza place or fast food outlet in Victoria BC, so your can have your beer and pizza or dinner and wine delivered together for one low price. Need groceries or something from the convenience store we can do that to, or a cigar after dinner. We are your Everything Delivery Service!
100% Satisfaction Is Mandatory.
We now offer a Grocery Delivery Service in Victoria BC! Thats Right, We do all the Work! You order, We pick it from the Grocery Store in Victoria BC & Deliver it to Your Door.

Just that simple...
Dial a Bottle from Victoria liquor delivery service, We offer bottle delivery in Victoria. Dial a bottle for delivery in Victoria pay with debit/credit/cash.

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Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT  PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE
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Now you can order at many of Victoria's Best Restaurants and have us deliver anywhere in Victoria.
Why have a regular Dine In Experience? When you can have more, Beer & More To Your Door.
You can also directly order from any Restaurant in Victoria and have us Deliver,
or save money by choosing from our Feature Restaurant Partners:
VICTORIA RESTAURANT GUIDE
We now offer a Grocery Delivery Service in Victoria BC! Thats Right, We do all the Work! You order, We pick it from the Grocery Store in Victoria BC & Deliver it to Your Door.
Just that simple...

Dial a Bottle from Victoria liquor delivery service, We offer bottle delivery in Victoria. Dial a bottle for delivery in Victoria pay with debit/credit/cash.

Call us now 250-882-7861

Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT DELIVERY PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE

Need a Designated Driver? Our Friends at Drivesmart would be happy to help.

  Drivesmart is
a different kind of driving company offering designated driver services in Victoria BC. During your ride home, we focus as much on the service as we do on the drive. Anyone can get you home in your car, but are you always comfortable having anyone drive your car? Would you feel safe with anyone driving you home? Our drivers are the difference. They are well groomed, well mannered, and friendly. You shouldn't have to worry about the ride home, and with us you wont. Go have some fun, call us when your done.
PREVENTING IMPARED DRIVING IS ARE NUMBER 1 PRIORITY, PLEASE DONT RISK IT.
FRIENDS DONT LET FRIENDS DRIVE DRUNK.


We will also pick up/delivery orders from any restaurant in Victoria BC, pizza place or fast food outlet in Victoria BC, so your can have your beer and pizza or dinner and wine delivered together for one low price. Need groceries or something from the convenience store we can do that to, or a cigar after dinner. We are your Everything Delivery Service!
Call us now 250-882-7861

Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT DELIVERY PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE

We are the lowest priced Liquor Delivery Service in Victoria BC!
No Restrictions! Any Restaurant in Victoria BC! Liquor Store Prices!
Beer Delivery Service Victoria BC - Cigarette Deliver
y Service Victoria BC
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Why Pay More!

Dial a Bottle from Victoria liquor delivery service, We offer bottle delivery in Victoria. Dial a bottle for delivery in Victoria pay with debit/credit/cash.
Call us now 250-882-7861

Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT DELIVERY PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE
We Can Deliver Almost Anything:
Common Delivery Places:
-Wal-Mart Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Red Barn Delivery Service
Victoria BC
-Restaurant Delivery Service Victoria BC

-Grocery Delivery Victoria BC
-Florist Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Pizza And Beer Delivery Victoria BC
Dial a Bottle from Victoria liquor delivery service, We offer bottle delivery in Victoria. Dial a bottle for delivery in Victoria pay with debit/credit/cash.
Call us now 250-882-7861

Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT DELIVERY PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE
Common Items We Deliver:
-Food Delivery Service
Victoria BC
-Store Pickup & Delivery Victoria BC
-Brewing Supplies Delivery Victoria BC
-Document Delivery Victoria BC
-Liquor Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Packaged Meats Delivery Victoria BC
-Bakery Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Beer Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Wine Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Cigarette Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Grocery Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Flower Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Convenience Store Delivery Service
Victoria BC
-Emergency Kitchen Delivery Victoria BC
-Pharmacy Delivery Service
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-Fast Food Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Pizza Delivery Service
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-Meal Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Snack Delivery Service Victoria BC
-Auto Parts Delivery Victoria BC
-Medical Deliverys Victoria BC
-Legal Deliverys Victoria BC
-Courier Service Victoria BC
-Parcel Pickup Victoria BC
-Pop Delivery Victoria BC
-Gift Delivery Victoria BC
-Errands run Victoria BC
and virtually anything else.
We deliver anywhere in Victoria BC and Langford BC*
Dial a Bottle from Victoria liquor delivery service, We offer bottle delivery in Victoria. Dial a bottle for delivery in Victoria pay with debit/credit/cash.
Call us now 250-882-7861

Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT DELIVERY PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE
Enjoy further savings when using one of our Feature Restaurant Partners

Unfortunately due to goverment regulations we can only deliver liquor (beer, wine, spirits) untill 11 pm.
We think there should always be an alternative to drinking and driving and this regulation leaves people who cannot afford a taxi with no option but to drink and drive. If you agree this service should be available 24hrs or atleast till the bars close please contact:
Honourable Shirley Bond
PO BOX 9053 STN PROV GOVT
VICTORIA BC V8W 9E2
Telephone: 250 356-7717
Fax: 250 356-8270


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Please support are delivery drivers, they depend on tips much like bartenders and also have to pay for gas and maintenance on there own vehicles.

This service is subsidized in part by our generous local sponsers listed below. Supporting local buisness has numerous positive effects for are community.

If you would like to support are organization or are interested in advertising on our site?
Please contact Shaw @ 250-882-7861 or shahabaz@gmail.com
(our site receives apx 500 hits per day)

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They also buy used batterys!
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We value your loyalty and with your help will continue to achieve are mission statement:
Providing an affordable alternative to drinking and driving.
We are proud supporters of M.A.D.D.
www.madd.ca/

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Dial a Bottle from Victoria liquor delivery service, We offer bottle delivery in Victoria. Dial a bottle for delivery in Victoria pay with debit/credit/cash.
Call us now 250-882-7861

Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT DELIVERY PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE

Impared Driving Consequences in BC

Drivers who blow in the warning range, between 0.05 and 0.08 per cent alcohol content, face an immediate three-day prohibition for a first offence, a $200 administrative penalty, a $250 driver's licence reinstatement fee and vehicle impound and storage fees.

Drivers blowing over 0.08 alcohol content or who refuse to provide a breath test face a 90-day driving ban, a $500 administrative penalty, a $250 driver's licence reinstatement fee, a 30-day vehicle impound and towing costs, the $880 cost of the responsible driver's program and $1,420 for an ignition interlock device.

Consequences

Warn range (.05 – .08)

Fail range (over .08)

1st time

2nd time*

3rd time*

 

Immediate roadside driving prohibition (loss of driver’s licence)

3 days

7 days

30 days

90 days

Vehicle impoundment for impaired driving

3 days**

7 days**

30 days

30 days

Estimated minimum towing, storage costs

$150

$210

$700

$700

Administrative penalty

$200

$300

$400

$500

Driver’s licence reinstatement fee

$250

$250

$250

$250

Responsible Driver Program requirement and cost***

n/a

n/a

Yes + $880

Yes +$880

Ignition Interlock requirement***

n/a

n/a

1 year

1 year

Ignition Interlock cost per year

n/a

n/a

$1,730

$1,730

Estimated total cost to you

$600

$760

$3,960

$4,060

Criminal charges

n/a

n/a

n/a

Possible


Dial a Bottle from Victoria liquor delivery service, We offer bottle delivery in Victoria. Dial a bottle for delivery in Victoria pay with debit/credit/cash.
Call us now 250-882-7861
Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT DELIVERY PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE


Frequently asked questions:

Q. How do you calculate your Delivery Fee*
A. Liquor Deliverys $10, Any of our restaurants $10 Feature Restaurant Partners  restaurant $10 + 25%, $2 for extra per extra stop.
Groceries Delivered $10 plus 25% on pick up total plus $1 per Item.

Q. Where do you Deliver?
A. We delivery anywhere in Victoria ($10 For Victoria Area), Helmeken & West Saanich Area ($10 delivery for Helmeken/West Saanich),
Langford ($20 delivery for Langford), Brentwood Bay ($30 for Brentwood Bay Area)

Q.How can I pay?
A. We accept Cash, Visa, Mastercard, American Express, Diners Club at the Door ($2 Debit/Credit Fee).

Q. How can I order?
A. You can order by calling one of our friendly representatives at 250-882-7861 or you can order online by clicking the link below.


Q. Can I order from any restaurant in Victoria?
A. Yes you can place an order at any restaurant and call us to pick it up and deliver it.

Q. What are your hours of operation?
A. We are open 7 days a week from 11am -11 pm.

Q. What kind of advertising options do you offer?
A. Our website boasts around 500 hits showcasing are local sponsers, we are also able to provide and distribute flyers to all our local sponsers and customers.
We depend on are local sponsers to help keep are prices affordable and pay for are advertising budget. Buisnesses that are interested can be showcased on are elevator adds in every residential/commerical building with advertising and in the victoria parkades. Aswell as Facebook and Google Adds we spend all are profits on advertising to ensure every person in Victoria knows that an alternative to drinking and driving.

Dial a Bottle from Victoria liquor delivery service, We offer bottle delivery in Victoria. Dial a bottle for delivery in Victoria pay with debit/credit/cash.
Call us now 250-882-7861

Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT DELIVERY PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE

Q. What are the penalties for drinking and driving in Victoria BC Canada?

A. The following information is found on ICBC's website
http://www.icbc.com/road-safety/safer-drivers/impaired-driving

Drinking and driving

Attitudes toward drinking and driving are changing. Most people agree that drunk driving is not okay. But many people think they're okay to drive after a few drinks.

The fact is, it doesn't take much alcohol to impair your driving. Just because you've only had a couple of drinks doesn't mean you're okay to drive.

B.C.'s drinking-driving laws are now tougher

New drinking-driving penalties under B.C.’s Motor Vehicle Act came into effect on Sept. 20 2010.

Police in B.C. can now issue an immediate roadside prohibition to an impaired driver with a blood-alcohol content (BAC) of .05 or higher. (The BAC is based on a breath sample into a roadside screening device.)

The vehicle the person is driving can also be immediately taken off the road and impounded for three to 30 days. 

Costs related to these offences can add up to an estimated $600 to $4,060—even if it’s the first time a driver is caught.

See summary of impaired driving consequences »

Possible criminal charges

Failing or refusing a breathalyzer test could also result in criminal charges.

If convicted, you would

  • be prohibited from driving for at least a year and
  • pay way more for car insurance.

If you drove while prohibited or suspended, your car could be impounded for a minimum of 60 days. You would also be subject to a $500 fine, jail time and more driving prohibitions.

Don't gamble with your car insurance

If you drive over the legal alcohol limit or under the influence of drugs, ICBC may not cover you under your Basic Autoplan.

If you crash while drinking and driving, you’re likely in breach of your insurance policy. That means you could be personally responsible for 100 per cent of the costs if you damage someone else’s property or injure them.

Learn more »

CounterAttack

Each year, we support enhanced police enforcement to shut down impaired driving through CounterAttack awareness campaigns in July and December.

Ignition interlock program

Up to 4,000 more British Columbians whose driving records show evidence of drinking and driving must now provide breath samples every time they operate their vehicles.

Learn more about Ignition Interlock external link(PDF).

 

BAR ASSOCIATION DRINKING, DRIVING AND THE LAW

We do now do grocery delivery in Victoria! Thats Right, we do all the Work! You order, We pick it from the grocery store and we Deliver it to Your Door.
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Dial a Bottle from Victoria liquor delivery service, We offer bottle delivery in Victoria. Dial a bottle for delivery in Victoria pay with debit/credit/cash.

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Victoria's Premier Liquor & More Delivery Service
RESTAURANT DELIVERY PARTNERS MENU'S & ONLINE ORDER PAGE

 

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Recent articles related to drinking and driving.
 

Class action lawsuit targets penalties under B.C.'s tough new drunk-driving law

VICTORIA — A class-action lawsuit challenging impaired driving penalties given out under B.C.'s tough new drunk driving law was filed in Vancouver Thursday.

The lawsuit says that, between Sept. 20 and Nov. 19, police officers throughout the province were negligent in their use of the roadside breathalyzer device that determines a driver's blood-alcohol level.

Legislation came into effect Sept. 20 that penalizes drivers whose blood-alcohol concentration is between .05 and .08. The reading is determined via a roadside breathalyzer that indicates "warn" if a person's blood-alcohol level is between those numbers.

The lawsuit alleges that up to Nov. 19, police used improperly programmed breathalyzers to determine the reading. That resulted in drivers being penalized when their blood-alcohol levels were below .05, said Michael Thomas, one of the lawyers who filed the lawsuit.

On Nov. 19, Victoria police Chief Jamie Graham, as chairman of the B.C. Association of Chiefs of Police traffic safety committee, recalled 2,200 roadside breathalyzers after RCMP lab tests found a margin of error in the devices. The RCMP found the units could indicate a reading over .05 when the driver was actually under it.

The units were recalibrated so that a "warn" reading is obtained if the driver blows .06, recognizing the potential machine error.

"The way the legislation is drafted, the public has to rely upon proper enforcement. Our allegation is that that wasn't done in this time period," Thomas said.

Police either improperly programmed the devices or failed to detect that they weren't programmed accurately, the lawsuit alleges. An estimated 170 people a week faced licence suspensions during the period, with penalties ranging from $600 to $4,060.

The minimum penalty is an immediate loss of licence for three days, a $200 penalty and a $250 licence reinstatement fee, and the likely loss of vehicle for the three days, plus towing and storage fees. That is for someone with one "warn" reading within five years. Penalties escalate for those with more.

In a class-action suit, one person sues on behalf of all the people who have similarly suffered. The lawsuit has to go to B.C. Supreme Court to be classified as a class-action suit before proceeding. That will likely happen within three months, Thomas said.

He will ask for repayment of costs incurred by people who were improperly penalized.

This week, Solicitor General Rich Coleman said the province is considering allowing drivers to appeal roadside penalties for impaired driving offences.

That would make no difference to the lawsuit, Thomas said.

 

Victoria police see dramatic decrease in drunk driving

With three months passed since new penalties for impaired driving in B.C., Victoria police have noticed a decline in drunk drivers.

"Anecdotally, yeah, there's a decrease in impaired (drivers)," said VicPD spokesman Sgt. Grant Hamilton.

In December, traditionally the department's second busiest month of the year for catching drunk drivers, VicPD officers stopped 13 drivers who blew in excess of .08 per cent blood alcohol. They received immediate roadside driving prohibitions and their vehicles were towed, said deputy chief John Ducker.

He added his count is likely low, as it doesn't include drivers pulled over by Integrated Road Safety Unit officers in regional CounterAttack roadblocks.

According to the department's 2009 statistics, officers pull over 160 impaired drivers per month on average. Since the new penalties came into effect Sept. 20, the number of impaired drivers and those who blow between 0.05 and 0.08, have decreased.

As part of their Christmas season roadblocks, VicPD officers pulled over about 2,500 drivers around Victoria and Esquimalt on Dec. 19. Just nine of those showed signs of impairment and were given a breathalyzer test. Six passed, two blew in the warn range (.05-.08) and one failed (over .08).

"That's just a change in people's behaviour. People are like, "this new driving legislation, I don't want to take a risk anymore," said Hamilton.

He added officers have noticed an increase in taxi use and designated drivers.

http://www.bclocalnews.com/vancouver_island_south/victorianews/news/113285769.html


B.C. introduces tough new drunk driving rules

VICTORIA - The B.C. Liberal government introduced new rules for drinking and driving Tuesday morning.

Drivers who blow above 0.08 will face a 90-day suspension and a $500 fine. As well, they will have their vehicle impounded for 30 days and may also face criminal charges.

Those who are between 0.05 and 0.08 will get a three-day ban and a $200 fine for a first offence.

Penalties in this range increase with subsequent offences.

Solicitor General Michael de Jong is calling the new rules - to come into effect in the fall - Canada's most immediate and severe impaired driving penalties.

"Despite increased enforcement and significant efforts to promote awareness, we've begun to see a rise in impaired driving across British Columbia," said de Jong. "That trend is unacceptable and that's why we're bringing in these new laws: to get impaired drivers off the road with clear, swift and severe penalties."

In addition, drivers who blow once in the "fail" range (above 0.08), or three times within five years in the "warn" range (between 0.05 and 0.08), will be required to take part in the rehabilitative Responsible Driver Program.

They must also for one year use an ignition interlock device, which tests a driver's breath for alcohol before the vehicle will start.

http://www.globaltvbc.com/world/introduces+tough+drunk+driving+rules/2957745/story.html
 

Are BC’s tough drunk driving laws about to get watered down?

Province says changes could come as soon as spring Victoria – The BC government rolled out the toughest drinking driving rules in Canada last April. The new rules took effect in September. Since then, drivers who are stopped with a blood alcohol level of 0.05 can face fines or have their cars impounded. That’s even though they’re well below the legal limit of 0.08. At the Swiftsure restaurant and lounge in Victoria, bartenders say the new get tough regulations have put a chill through regulars who already know where to draw the line. BC’s restaurant industry estimates business is off 30 per cent since the rules took effect. Even the government’s own members say the new laws aren’t going down so smooth with constituents. Now, under a lot of pressure, BC’s top cop says he’ll consider changes. Solicitor-general Rich Coleman says the real problem is that his government hasn’t explained the new laws to British Columbians well enough.

http://www.drunk-driving-law.org/2011/03/25/are-bcs-tough-drunk-driving-laws-about-to-get-watered-down.html

Cool blog New drinking laws - will your slogan be 1 or none?

http://forums.weddingbells.ca/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=2607994


B.C.'s Campbell clarifies drunk-driving remarks

VICTORIA — B.C. Premier Gordon Campbell has clarified remarks he made suggesting penalizing drinking drivers was not the right approach in dealing with the problem.

In a visit to the Kamloops, B.C., area Thursday, Campbell said he thinks about his drunk-driving arrest every day and believes the best way to avoid penalties is by choosing not to drink and drive. Campbell, who was charged last month while on vacation in Hawaii, said the pain inflicted on friends and family should make people stop and think.

"I think penalties are one way of dealing with this but they're not the right way," he said.

"When penalties happen it's because somebody made the wrong decision, like myself. You made the decision to drink and drive. I think it's far more important for people, for example, to reflect on what I went through."

But on Friday, Campbell distanced himself from his previous comment.

"My point is not that there shouldn't be penalties. There should be penalties," he said on his way into a cabinet meeting.

"My point was that what we want to try and do is not have people drink and drive, period. So we have to move to preventative measures."

People must understand they should not drink and drive, said Campbell, hoping that some day no one would do it.

"That's the critical thing for society," he said.

Campbell was pulled over on the resort island of Maui when police observed him driving erratically after visiting friends for dinner.

His initial breath test showed he had twice the legally permissible level of alcohol in his system.

Campbell was arrested and spent the night in police cells. His case goes to court March 25.

When news of his arrest reached British Columbia the following day it set off a political storm.

Campbell held an emotional news conference where he admitted he had made a mistake and said he would not contest the charge. He also promised to stop drinking and seek counselling, but said he would not resign as premier.

Campbell said Thursday his ordeal should be an example to others.

"I think lots of people understand that that was very hurtful to me, and more importantly than me, my family, my friends, all the people that counted on me," he said.

http://ottawa.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20030207/campbell_driving030207?hub=CalgaryHome

Drinking and Driving


Script 190 gives general information only, not legal advice. If you have a legal problem or need legal advice, you should speak to a lawyer. For the name of a lawyer to consult, call Lawyer Referral at 604.687.3221 in the lower mainland or 1.800.663.1919 elsewhere in British Columbia.


This script explains what may happen if you drink and drive.

What are the charges for drinking and driving?
You risk three serious criminal charges under the Criminal Code of Canada if you drink and drive:

  1.  “impaired driving” (caused by alcohol or drugs – both legal prescription drugs and illegal ones)
  2. driving with a blood-alcohol level over 80 milligrams (called “over .08”)
  3. failing or refusing to provide breath or blood samples on demand (called “refusing to blow”)

Although this script deals only with driving a vehicle, these charges apply if you’re driving a car, boat, plane, or other motor vehicle or vessel. They can apply even if you weren’t driving and didn’t move the vehicle – as long as you had care or control of it. Care or control of a vehicle means you were in the driver’s seat and had access to the ignition key, even if you were parked.

Drinking and driving is a complicated area of law with very serious consequences. So if you’re not sure how much you’ve had to drink, don’t even get in the vehicle – take a taxi instead.

If the police stop you, what tests must you take?

Blow into an approved roadside-screening device or ASD

If you are operating a vehicle or have care or control of it (even if it’s not moving) and the police reasonably suspect that you have alcohol in your body, they may legally require, or demand, that you immediately blow into a small machine called an approved roadside-screening device or ASD. If the police don’t do this right away, they may not be able to use your readings at trial.

Before requiring you to blow, the police do not have to tell you that you have a Charter right, under section 10(b), to call a lawyer. And you don’t have the right to speak to a lawyer before you decide whether to blow or refuse – you have to decide right away. If you refuse, it’s hard to win in court.  

The ASD tests for alcohol in your body, and it can show a “pass,” “warn,” or “fail.” It shows a warn for blood-alcohol levels between 50 and 100 milligrams of alcohol in 100 milliliters of blood, and a fail for levels of 100 milligrams or higher. The legal limit is 80 milligrams, called .08. If the ASD shows a pass, the police will probably let you leave. (But that’s not automatic – see the section below called, “What can happen under the BC Motor Vehicle Act – even if you’re not over .08.”) If the ASD shows a warn or fail, the police may demand you take a breathalyzer test.

Take a breathalyzer test
A breathalyzer is a machine that measures the alcohol in your breath to see if you have more than the legal limit of .08. It’s more accurate than the ASD, and is operated by a qualified technician.  

The police may demand you take a breathalyzer test only if they have reasonable and probable grounds to believe that you are:

  1. operating a vehicle, or having care or control of it, while your ability is impaired, or
  2. committing, or have committed in the previous 3 hours, the offence of impaired driving.

This means the police must have good reason to believe your ability to drive is impaired by alcohol. The police often use a fail result on the ASD as reasonable and probable grounds to demand a breathalyzer test.  If the police demand that you take a breathalyzer test, you must:

  1. go with the police to where the breathalyzer is located (usually, the local police station), and
  2. give breath samples (usually two) so your blood-alcohol level can be analyzed.

Because you are legally held, or detained, the police must tell you of your right to a lawyer – and other Charter rights – before you give breath samples. They must also give you a chance to contact a lawyer you choose – a private lawyer or a Legal Aid Duty Counsel – before you give breath samples. The police must stop trying to get samples or other evidence from you until you have had the chance to talk with a lawyer in private. For more on Charter rights, refer to scripts 200 and 230

If you are unable to give a breath sample because of your physical condition, the police may require you to let a qualified medical practitioner take samples of your blood for analysis. The medical practitioner must be satisfied that taking samples won’t harm you. You have the right to speak to a lawyer before giving a blood sample.

If you are unconscious, you can’t agree to give a sample. So the police must get a warrant to take samples, which they can get by phoning a judge.

Things you don’t have to do
You don’t have to tell the police whether you drank or how much you drank. If the police ask you to do physical tests, such as balance tests, you can refuse to do them. Later, at your trial, the court cannot use your refusal to do the tests as evidence to find you guilty.

Summary of what you must do
If the police demand it, you must:

  1. blow into the ASD.
  2. go with the police and give breath or blood samples for further analysis.

You must do these things unless you have a reasonable excuse not to. If you refuse to do them, you are committing an offence.

What is a reasonable excuse?
Courts are strict about what a reasonable excuse is. You may have a reasonable excuse if the police don’t let you speak to a lawyer in private before requiring you to give samples. But you must assert or claim your right to a lawyer. This means that when the police tell you your rights under the Charter, you must say you want to use, or exercise, those rights and speak to a lawyer. The legal issues are complicated and the best warning is this: if the police demand you take a breathalyzer test, talk to a lawyer before doing so. Then, follow the lawyer’s advice.

How does the breathalyzer work?
The breathalyzer is a machine that samples deep lung air by using infra-red light to measure the concentration of alcohol in a person’s blood. It gives the results in milligrams per 100 milliliters. If you have over 80 milligrams (called “over .08”) you are legally too drunk to drive, and can be convicted of a criminal offence. 

The technician will ask you to breathe deeply into a plastic mouthpiece connected to the machine. It takes several minutes to analyze the sample. The technician will wait at least 15 minutes and then usually ask you to do it again. Then the technician will give you a certificate describing the test results. Keep it, and give it to your lawyer. 

You won’t be charged with over .08 if the test results are less than 80 milligrams of alcohol. But, even with a result under 80 milligrams, or no breathalyzer test, the police can take your licence and stop you from driving for 24 hours if they believe your ability to drive is affected by alcohol. 

What if your test results are over .08 or you refuse to blow?
If your results are over .08, you will be charged with over .08. If you fail to give a breath or blood sample, you will be charged with refusing to blow. You could also be charged with impaired driving.

In addition to the criminal charge, you will also get a 90-day administrative driving prohibition, called an ADP, if your test results are over .08 or you refuse to give a sample of breath or blood. This is issued under the BC Motor Vehicle Act. The technician must complete a certificate of the test results and send a copy to the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles, along with a report explaining why the samples were taken. The police can then issue an ADP, with a Prohibition Notice. This Notice is your temporary license until the ADP starts – 21 days after the Notice is served on you. You have 7 days to appeal an ADP, by applying to the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles for a review. An adjudicator hears your appeal and decides whether to confirm or cancel the ADP. See the last section of this script for changes that the BC government announced for the fall of 2010.

The Superintendent must cancel the ADP if you:

  • were not operating or did not have care or control of a motor vehicle,
  • did not have a blood alcohol level over .08 within 3 hours of driving,
  • did not fail or refuse to provide a breath sample, or
  • had a reasonable excuse for failing to comply with a demand for a breath or blood alcohol test.

Do you also have to give a DNA sample if a court orders you to?
Yes. Under the DNA Identification Act, the prosecutor can ask the court to order you to give a sample of your DNA for a national database. The prosecutor needs a warrant under the Criminal Code to do this. The prosecutor would probably not do this unless you were in a serious accident while impaired or over .08.

What happens in court?
If you are charged with any of the three offences, you or your agent will have to go to court. There are legal defences to the three charges, but they are very technical and you need legal advice. You should get at least some initial advice from a lawyer, even if you decide not to have one in court.

The prosecutor must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that you committed the offence. For impaired driving, the prosecutor must prove your ability to drive a motor vehicle was impaired by alcohol or a drug. The prosecutor does not have to prove you were drunk.

For over .08, the prosecutor must prove your blood alcohol level was over 80 milligrams and there was no error in the reading. And for failing to blow, the prosecutor must prove that you failed to give samples – without a reasonable excuse. 

The prosecutor normally calls as witnesses the police officer that stopped you, any other people who saw you, and depending on the charge, the technician. The witnesses would tell the judge how you acted, whether you refused to give samples, and what signs of impairment they noticed. Common signs of impairment include the smell of alcohol on the breath, bloodshot eyes, poor balance, or slurred speech. The technician would tell the judge how they performed the breathalyzer test and any physical symptoms they saw.

You have the right to testify (tell the court your side) and you may want to, if you can explain what the witnesses said and raise a reasonable doubt whether you were impaired. For example, perhaps you had an ear infection that affected your balance, or some physical problem that caused you to slur your speech.

What are the penalties?
For a first offence of over .08, impaired driving, or refusing to blow, the mandatory minimum sentence is a $1000 fine and a one-year driving prohibition. That is the usual sentence, unless the judge considers your case more serious because of aggravating facts such as high breathalyzer readings or an accident.

Previous drinking and driving convictions mean higher penalties – usually a minimum of 30 days jail for a second offence within a few years of the previous conviction, and a minimum of 120 days jail for each offence after that. And if you kill or injure someone by drinking and driving, you risk being sued for a lot of money and your insurance company will not cover you. The penalty for killing someone while impaired or over .08 is always a jail term.

A conviction will also mean you have to pay much higher vehicle insurance premiums and lose your insurance coverage.

What can happen under the BC Motor Vehicle Act – even if you’re not over .08?
Even if your blood alcohol level is not over .08, you may be immediately prohibited from driving for 24 hours under section 215 of the BC Motor Vehicle Act. To issue this 24-hour prohibition, the police must have reasonable and probable grounds to believe that your ability to drive is affected by alcohol or a drug. The police may also impound your vehicle for 24 hours.

If the police give you a 24-hour prohibition without first testing your blood-alcohol level, you have the right to ask for a breath test. If the breath test shows your blood-alcohol level is not over .05, the police must end the prohibition. If you ask for a breath test, the police can use either an approved roadside-screening device (ASD) where they stop you or a breathalyzer at a police station.

If the police give you a 24-hour prohibition, you may apply to the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles for a review within 7 days of when the police give you the prohibition. The Superintendent must cancel the prohibition if the police failed to test your blood-alcohol level when you requested it, or if you were not the driver or did not have care or control of the vehicle.

A novice driver in the graduated licensing program may get a 12-hour suspension if a breath test with an ASD shows that they have any alcohol in their body. The police can also issue a 12-hour suspension if the novice driver refuses the screening test. There is no review of this suspension.

As of February 1, 2009, the BC government requires drivers to install an ignition interlock device on their vehicles for one year if they have had any of the following 3 situations:

  • a criminal conviction for drinking and driving.
  • three 24-hour roadside suspensions in five years.
  • two 90-day administrative driving prohibitions in five years.

This device requires drivers to provide a breath sample before they can start the vehicle. It also requires drivers to periodically give more breath samples during longer trips (about 10 to 12 samples a day). The BC government estimates the device will cost each driver about $1,560 to enroll in the program, install the device in their vehicle, have monthly monitoring, and remove the device from their vehicle.

BC announces stronger and more immediate penalties starting in autumn 2010
In April 2010, the BC government said it will increase penalties in the Motor Vehicle Act in the fall of 2010, especially for repeat offenders. And penalties will apply more quickly.

If your blood alcohol level on the ASD is between .05 and .08, the new penalties will be as follows:

  • The first time it happens in a 5-year period, you will lose your driver’s license immediately for 3 days (instead of 24 hours). You may also lose your vehicle for 3 days and have to pay towing and storage fees of about $150. You will also have to pay a $200 administrative driving penalty and a $250 driver's license reinstatement fee. Your total cost will be about $600. 
  • The second time it happens in a 5-year period, you will immediately lose your license (and maybe your vehicle) for 7 days and the administrative driving penalty will increase to $300 (plus the $250 reinstatement fee). 
  • The third time it happens in a 5-year period, you will immediately lose both your license and your vehicle for 30 days and the penalty will increase to $400 (plus the $250 reinstatement fee). To get your driver’s license back, you will have to complete the Responsible Driver Program and use an ignition interlock device whenever you drive, for a full year after your driving suspension is over. With the penalties, plus costs for towing, storage, this program, and the device, you will have to pay about $3,650 before you can legally operate a motor vehicle again in BC.

If your blood alcohol level on the ASD is over .08 or you fail or refuse to provide a breath sample, you will: 

  • immediately lose your driver’s license for 90 days and your vehicle for 30 days (it now takes 21 days before you lose your driver’s license and the police have to take you to their station for testing).
  • have to pay all related towing and storage fees (about $700). 
  • have to pay a $500 administrative driving penalty and a $250 driver's license reinstatement fee.
And to get your driver’s license back in this case, you will have to complete the Responsible Driver Program ($880) and use an ignition interlock device ($1420) whenever you drive, for a full year after your driving suspension is over. In total, you will have to pay about $3,750 before you can legally operate a motor vehicle again in BC.

Drivers can appeal these roadside driving prohibitions, but the fees to appeal will double.

These increased penalties under the BC Motor Vehicle Act are additional to the criminal charges you may face if your results are over .08 or you refuse to blow, as explained earlier in this script.

For more on these changes, as well as penalties and appeals under the BC Motor Vehicle Act, go to the website of the BC Superintendent of Motor Vehicles at www.pssg.gov.bc.ca/osmv and click on “Impaired Driving”.

Finally, there are some recent technical additions to the law. You should see a lawyer for more information.

http://www.cba.org/bc/public_media/automobiles/190.aspx


To deal with drunk drivers more effectively, the Province has brought in stronger impaired-driving legislation, with a focus on increased enforcement, higher penalties and mandatory rehabilitation. 

Key measures that are removing drinking drivers from B.C. roads and improving public safety include:

  • Automatic vehicle impoundment for drinking driving. Drunk drivers caught behind the wheel and given a 24-hour roadside prohibition from driving automatically lose the keys to the vehicle for 24 hours and earn a visit to the impound lot. Last year, there were nearly 39,000 24-hour prohibitions. There are additional, tough penalties for drivers caught behind the wheel driving at or over the criminal limit or who refuse a breath sample – including 90-day prohibitions given out by police, and criminal charges.
  • User-pay Ignition Interlock Devices. Launched in November 2005, this program targets bad drivers, including those who have participated in drinking driver rehab programs. Participants are chosen by the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles based on driving records and may only drive interlock-equipped vehicles. Failure to comply results in loss of their driver’s licence. To date, 414 interlock devices have been installed.
  • Beefed-up Roadside Enforcement. Air 1, the police traffic helicopter, was involved in the arrest of 161 suspects, including drunk drivers, in its first year. This year, the Province is funding a new Mobile Impaired Driving Unit as an additional tool to support police road checks on the Lower Mainland, and provided police with $198,000 for an additional 33 patrol car video cameras, which can support impaired charges. Integrated police road safety units in all parts of the province are dedicated to traffic enforcement, including catching drunk drivers.
  • Civil forfeiture. In spring 2008, the Province amended its civil forfeiture legislation enabling the forfeiture of vehicles of drunk drivers whose risky behaviour causes or is likely to cause serious injury or death.
  • Stronger drunk-driving legislation, introduced in 2004, features enhanced enforcement tactics, increased penalties and mandatory rehabilitation.
  • In 2005, government introduced a mandatory, user-pay alcohol rehab program for all drivers with an alcohol-related Criminal Code conviction.  Those who don’t complete the program either lose their licence or can’t re-license. Over 5,000 drivers have registered and almost 2,700 have completed the program, which includes one-on-one assessments and – for those with significant issues – a lengthy period of counselling. B.C.’s program also targets drivers under the legal limit who have multiple drinking-driving offences.
  • In 2005, minimum fines for driving while suspended or prohibited jumped to $500 from $300.
  • Judges can also now jail a drunk driver on a first offence, based on individual circumstances, for up to seven days. (Jail is mandatory for 14 days for a second offence). Between 2004 and 2005, driving-while-prohibited convictions increased 46 per cent (from 1,385 in 2004 to 2,022 in 2005).
  • Prohibited drivers (including drivers prohibited for drunk driving) caught the first time behind the wheel get an automatic 60-day vehicle impoundment. The penalty used to be 30 days. For a second offence, prohibited drivers lose the keys to their vehicle for 90 days (versus 30 days under the old system).
  • To further police training related to stopping drinking and driving, the Office of the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles has hired a police liaison officer who will work directly with the enforcement community, including on training.
  • B.C.’s Graduated Licensing Program (GLP), which has resulted in a 16 per cent drop in new driver crash rates, includes specific provisions related to new drivers and alcohol.
  • Enhanced in 2003, the program now allows authorities to make new drivers, suspended for any reason including alcohol, repeat their two-year novice period. These drivers are subject to a zero-alcohol test until they exit the Graduated Licensing Program and have two years of ‘clean’ driving.
  • B.C.’s drunk-driving programs are contributing to increased public safety on our roads:
  • Drinking-driving convictions rose to 4,406 in 2007 from 4,190 in 2006.
  • Driving-while-prohibited convictions rose 40 per cent between 2004 and 2006, from 1,385 convictions in 2004 to an average of 1,940 in 2005 and 2006.
  • Over 5,000 drivers are registered in the Responsible Driver Program and nearly 2,700 have completed it so far.
http://www.gov.bc.ca/fortherecord/drinking/dr_safety.html

NEWS RELEASE

B.C. INTRODUCES CANADA’S TOUGHEST IMPAIRED DRIVING LAWS

 

VICTORIA – The Province is introducing Canada’s most immediate and severe impaired driving penalties to save lives, curb repeat offenders and give police more enforcement tools, Solicitor General Michael de Jong, QC, announced today.

 

“Despite increased enforcement and significant efforts to promote awareness, we’ve begun to see a rise in impaired driving across British Columbia,” said de Jong. “That trend is unacceptable and that’s why we’re bringing in these new laws: to get impaired drivers off the road with clear, swift and severe penalties.”

 

In memory of Alexa Middelaer, de Jong also announced a provincial goal: to reduce alcohol-impaired driving fatalities by 35 per cent by the end of 2013. Middelaer was four when she was killed by an alleged drunk driver in Delta two years ago.

 

Under changes to the Motor Vehicle Act (MVA), drivers who provide a failing breath sample above 0.08 per cent BAC or refuse to provide a breath sample at the roadside will face an immediate, 90-day driving ban and a $500 fine. As well, they will have their vehicle impounded for 30 days. They may also face criminal charges.

 

Drivers caught once in the “warn” range (between 0.05 and 0.08 per cent BAC) in a five-year period will face an immediate, three-day driving ban and a $200 fine; a second time, a seven-day ban and a $300 fine; and a third, a 30-day ban and a $400 fine. Research shows that driving with a BAC in that range means a driver is seven times more likely to be in a fatal crash than if they have no alcohol in their body.

 

In addition, drivers who blow once in the “fail” range, or three times within five years in the “warn” range, will be required to participate in the rehabilitative Responsible Driver Program. They must also use an ignition interlock device, which tests a driver’s breath for alcohol every time they operate their vehicle, for one year.

 

“B.C.’s measures target impaired drivers more effectively than any Canadian jurisdiction has to date,” said Andrew Murie, CEO of Mothers Against Drunk Driving Canada. “We believe these major, escalating penalties will better support both deterrence and enforcement, save lives and prevent hundreds of injuries each year on B.C.’s roads. We encourage other provinces to study what B.C. is doing and follow its example.”

 

The new, roadside-issued, 90-day bans mean officers will no longer need to take drivers to the station for a full breath analysis in order to impose a driving ban longer than 24 hours.

 

“We believe that this new initiative will help all law enforcement officers to apprehend and reduce the number of impaired drivers in our province,” said Insp. Mike Diack of the RCMP’s B.C. Traffic Services. “There are people killed on B.C. highways each year as a direct result of impaired drivers. With additional enforcement powers, our police officers will be better equipped to reduce those casualties. Harm reduction is our number-one priority.”

 

The changes to B.C.’s impaired driving laws are expected to come into effect in fall 2010. More information on the changes is available at www.pssg.gov.bc.ca/osmv/ online.

 

Details of other changes to the MVA introduced today that relate to motorcycle safety, driver fitness and driver’s licences for agricultural workers are highlighted in an information bulletin at http://www2.news.gov.bc.ca/news_releases_2009-2013/2010PSSG0025-000470.htm.

 

-30-

 

A backgrounder follows.

 

For audio clips of Solicitor General Mike de Jong speaking about B.C.’s new impaired driving laws, please visit www.pssg.gov.bc.ca/mediaroom/2010/index.htm online.

 

Media Contact:

 

Media Relations

Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General

250 356-6961

 

For more information on government services or to subscribe to the Province’s news feeds using RSS, visit the Province’s website at www.gov.bc.ca.

 


BACKGROUNDER

For Immediate Release
2010PSSG0026-000472

April 27, 2010

Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General

 

 

 

 

B.C.’S IMPAIRED DRIVING LAW TO CHANGE

 

Major amendments introduced today to impaired driving sections of the Motor Vehicle Act (MVA) will ensure impaired drivers caught in B.C. face instant loss of their driving privileges and impoundment of their vehicles. The new measures are better focused on deterring everyone – from the driver caught once with blood-alcohol content (BAC) in the “warn” range, to habitual impaired drivers.

 

Immediate, Severe Penalties

 

Penalties for all impaired drivers will increase. For example, a driver who provides a breath sample in the “fail” range on a roadside screening device (above 0.08 per cent BAC) will face:

 

  • An immediate, 90-day driving ban and a $500 administrative penalty. Currently, a driver who receives a 90-day ban may still drive for three weeks before that ban is in effect, and no administrative penalty applies.
  • A driver’s licence reinstatement fee of $250 – up from the current $100.
  • A bill of about $700 for towing and 30 days of impoundment. Currently, drivers may get their vehicle back the day after they are caught.
  • Mandatory participation in the existing Responsible Driver Program, which costs participants $880, and mandatory use of an ignition interlock device for one year, which currently costs $1,420.

·         Thus, one “fail” on a roadside screening device will cost a driver about $3,750 before they can legally operate a vehicle again, following any related suspension.

·         The driver may also face an impaired driving charge under the Criminal Code of Canada.

 

A driver who provides a breath sample in the “warn” range on a roadside screening device (between 0.05 and 0.08 per cent BAC) for the first time in a five-year period will face:

 

·         A three-day driving ban and a $200 administrative penalty. (Note: these will rise to a seven-day ban and $300 penalty for a second “warn” reading within five years, and a 30-day ban and $400 penalty for a third “warn” reading within five years.) Currently, a 24-hour driving ban is common for a “warn.”

  • A driver’s licence reinstatement fee of $250. This is a new cost for this driver, as the current reinstatement fee of $100 only applies to driving bans longer than 24 hours.
  • The possibility of three days of vehicle impoundment, which will cost about $150.

·         Thus, a driver’s first “warn” will cost about $600 once the new laws are in effect.


 

 

Improved Enforcement

 

Police will have more certain and effective alternatives than the current processes involved in issuing any administrative penalty more serious than a 24-hour driving prohibition. Currently, when a driver’s breath sample registers a “warn,” officers can issue only a 24-hour ban at the roadside, regardless of how many times a driver has been caught in that range. With the changes, officers will be able to revoke driving privileges immediately and for longer periods, with concurrent vehicle impoundment.

 

Focusing charges on impaired drivers with a previous conviction or ban for impaired driving, or who cause serious harm or death, will also support more effective enforcement. It takes more than four days of a police officer’s time, on average, to gather evidence, prepare reports for Crown counsel and appear in court to support an impaired driving charge.

 

A Fair, Comprehensive Review Process

 

Drivers who receive a roadside prohibition will continue to have the opportunity to have the prohibition reviewed by the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles.

 

To seek a review, a driver will need to file an application within seven days of a prohibition. The superintendent will then consider all available information – including from police, the driver and Crown counsel – and complete the review within 21 days. The prohibition will remain in effect during this review.

 

Review fees are doubling to $100 for a written review and $200 for an oral review to help offset more of the costs currently covered by taxpayers.

 

Fairness for Impound Operators

 

The impoundment provisions in the impaired driving amendments will depend on partnerships with private towing and impound operators. To facilitate this, other changes to the MVA will streamline B.C.’s vehicle impoundment program to ensure towing and impound operators are fairly compensated and better able to process more vehicles. Currently, drivers frequently abandon low-value vehicles that have been impounded, incurring unpaid storage, processing and scrapping costs for impound operators.

 

-30-

 

Media Contact:

 

Media Relations

Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General

250 356-6961

 

For more information on government services or to subscribe to the Province’s news feeds using RSS, visit the Province’s website at www.gov.bc.ca.

http://www2.news.gov.bc.ca/news_releases_2009-2013/2010PSSG0026-000472.htm

 

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